How to prepare Planbeef

RECIPE

three ripe plantain
500grm beef (parboiled)
5 massive Tomatoes
6 crimson bonnet Pepper
three medium measurement Onion bulbs
Pink, Inexperienced and yellow bell pepper (chopped)
Vegetable oil for frying
1 teaspoon of Curry powder
three Seasoning cubes
1 teaspoon of Thyme
Salt to style

PROCEDURE

Blend the tomatoes, fresh pepper and one onion together until semi smooth and put aside. Chop the bell peppers and one onion and put aside.

Cut the plantain in dice form and the parboiled beef. fry until golden brown and put aside.

Pour vegetable oil right into a deep pan, place on medium heat. When hot, add the chopped onions, sauté until translucent, then add the tomato, pepper and onion combine, thyme, curry powder, seasoning dice and salt to style. Fry for 10-12 minute (be sure you stir each now and ten to forestall burning).

Add within the chopped bell peppers and fry for 3mintues. Add the fried beef then the fried plantain, cook dinner for a minute. Don’t cook dinner for too lengthy to keep away from the plantain turning into soggy.
Planbeef Is prepared for consumption…

Serve as sauce for white rice or small chops concept.

How to prepare Yambeefdodo

YAMBEEFDODO is just a twist of PLANBEEF recipe (hope you tried out the Planbeef recipe and loved it). It’s fusion of beef, fried plantain, fried yam and spicy tomato/pepper stew.

Not like PLANBEEF, YAMBEEFDODO is not as candy as PLANBEEF as a result of the addition of yam knocks off a few of the sweetness of the ripe plantain thereby making it extra filling and a full meal fairly than a dish.

Let me introduce you to the components

RECIPE

Sizeable yam
three ripe plantain
500grm beef (parboiled)
5 giant Tomatoes
6 crimson bonnet Pepper
three medium dimension Onion bulbs
Crimson, Inexperienced and
yellow bell pepper (chopped)
Vegetable oil for frying
1 teaspoon of Curry powder
three Seasoning cubes
1 teaspoon of Thyme
Salt to style

PROCEDURE

Mix the tomatoes, contemporary pepper and one onion collectively until semi clean and put aside. Chop the bell peppers and one onion and put aside.

Chop the yam into massive dimension, minimize the plantain in dice form and the parboiled beef. fry until golden brown and put aside.

Pour vegetable oil right into a deep pan, place on medium warmth. When sizzling, add the chopped onions, sauté until translucent, then add the tomato, pepper and onion combine, thyme, curry powder, seasoning dice and salt to style. Fry for 10-12 minute (make sure to stir now and again to stop burning).

Add within the chopped bell peppers and fry for 3mintues. Add the fried beef then the fried yam, stir and mix, go away to prepare dinner for two minutes. Then add the fried plantain, prepare dinner for a minute. Don’t prepare dinner for too lengthy to keep away from the plantain changing into soggy.

YAMBEEFDODO Is prepared for consumption…

Pigeon infestation at Waverley Mall shopping centre’s food court

Food safety inspectors are to visit an Edinburgh shopping mall following an infestation of pigeons in its food court.

The inspectors will meet managers at Waverley Mall in Princes Street to assess the mall’s pigeon control plans.

As many as eight birds have been seen in the court at one time with some even being seen flying at table height.

Waverly Mall officials said they had only received two complaints in 18 months.

Shopkeepers in the centre told BBC Scotland the “vermin” live and roost inside the mall.

Waverley Mall food court Pic: Angie Brown
Image captionShopkeepers said pigeons were living and roosting in Waverley Mall

They said a flock of pigeons entered the building last winter when work to widen its entrances meant there were no doors for a while.

Shop owners said mall managers had made many attempts to remove the pigeons humanely, to no avail.

It is understood plans to use high-frequency technology, which neighbouring Waverley Station used, was mothballed following complaints from people saying it affected their hearing aids.

Managers have asked pest control to investigate.

Source: https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-scotland-edinburgh-east-fife-51135909?intlink_from_url=https://www.bbc.com/news/topics/cp7r8vglgq1t/food&link_location=live-reporting-story

Ketogenic diet helps tame flu virus

A high-fat, low-carbohydrate diet like the Keto regimen has its fans, but influenza apparently isn’t one of them.

Mice fed a ketogenic diet were better able to combat the flu virus than mice fed food high in carbohydrates, according to a new Yale University study published Nov. 15 in the journal Science Immunology.

The ketogenic diet — which for people includes meat, fish, poultry, and non-starchy vegetables — activates a subset of T cells in the lungs not previously associated with the immune system’s response to influenza, enhancing mucus production from airway cells that can effectively trap the virus, the researchers report.

“This was a totally unexpected finding,” said co-senior author Akiko Iwasaki, the Waldemar Von Zedtwitz Professor of Immunobiology and Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology, and an investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute.

The research project was the brainchild of two trainees — one working in Iwasaki’s lab and the other with co-senior author Visha Deep Dixit, the Waldemar Von Zedtwitz Professor of Comparative Medicine and of Immunobiology. Ryan Molony worked in Iwasaki’s lab, which had found that immune system activators called inflammasomes can cause harmful immune system responses in their host. Emily Goldberg worked in Dixit’s lab, which had shown that the ketogenic diet blocked formation of inflammasomes.

The two wondered if diet could affect immune system response to pathogens such as the flu virus.

They showed that mice fed a ketogenic diet and infected with the influenza virus had a higher survival rate than mice on a high-carb normal diet. Specifically, the researchers found that the ketogenic diet triggered the release of gamma delta T cells, immune system cells that produce mucus in the cell linings of the lung — while the high-carbohydrate diet did not.

When mice were bred without the gene that codes for gamma delta T cells, the ketogenic diet provided no protection against the influenza virus.

“This study shows that the way the body burns fat to produce ketone bodies from the food we eat can fuel the immune system to fight flu infection,” Dixit said.

Atmospheric waves in the jet stream present risk to global food production

In a new study published today in Nature Climate Change, scientists show how specific wave patterns in the jet stream strongly increase the chance of co-occurring heatwaves in major food producing regions of Northern America, Western Europe and Asia. Their research finds that these simultaneous heatwaves significantly reduce crop production across those regions, creating the risk of multiple harvest failures and other far-reaching societal consequences, including social unrest.

Lead author, Dr Kai Kornhuber from the University of Oxford’s Department of Physics and Colombia University’s Earth Institute, said: “Co-occurring heatwaves will become more severe in the coming decades if greenhouse gases are not mitigated. In an interconnected world, this can lead to food price spikes and have impacts on food availability even in remote regions not directly affected by heatwaves.

“We found a 20-fold increase in the risk of simultaneous heatwaves in major crop producing regions when these global scale wind patterns are in place. Until now this was an underexplored vulnerability in the food system. We have found that during these events there actually is a global structure in the otherwise quite chaotic circulation. The bell can ring in multiple regions at once and the impacts of those specific interconnections were not quantified previously.”

Western North America, Western Europe and the Caspian Sea region are particularly susceptible to these atmospheric patterns that get heat and drought locked into one place simultaneously where they then affect crops production yields.

Dr Dim Coumou, co-author from the Institute for Environmental Studies at VU Amsterdam, said: “Normally low harvests in one region are expected to be balanced out by good harvests elsewhere but these waves can cause reduced harvests in several important breadbaskets simultaneously, creating risks for global food production.”

Dr Elisabeth Vogel, co-author from Melbourne University, said: “During years in which two or more summer weeks featured the amplified wave pattern, cereal crop production was reduced by more than 10% in individual regions, and by 4% when averaged across all crop regions affected by the pattern.”

Dr Radley Horton, co-author from the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory at Colombia University, said: “If climate models are unable to reproduce these wave patterns, risk managers such as reinsurers and food security experts may face a blind spot when assessing how simultaneous heat waves and their impacts could change in a warming climate.”

The scientists conclude that a thorough understanding of what drives this jet stream behaviour could ultimately improve seasonal predictions of agricultural production at the global scale and inform risk assessments of harvest failures across multiple food-producing regions.

Source: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/12/191209112147.htm

Researchers devises a technique to inoculate food crops from being infected by viruses in the future.

While the concept of ‘going viral’ is perceived as a positive thing on social media, it is decidedly a negative thing when it comes to plants, animals, and other forms of life. Viruses are said to be the most abundant forms of life on the planet, and they have become particularly adept at infecting agricultural plants. European researchers recently devised a technique to inoculate food crops from being infected by viruses in the future.

When viruses infect agricultural crops, they usually cause diseases that destroy the crops or significantly reduce their quality and yield. As with other living organisms, plants have multiple immune responses against viral infections, one of which involves producing small interfering ribonucleic acids (siRNAs) by chopping up viral RNA. The siRNAs then use special proteins to locate and dismantle viral RNA. However, many of the siRNAs that plants produce are not adept at eradicating viral RNA.

Researchers at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg have developed a method to screen plants for siRNAs that have the best antiviral properties and extract them to use as plant vaccines. The scientists have demonstrated the effectiveness of this vaccination method in a laboratory, but they must conduct further research to perfect the process and ensure that it will be effective outside of laboratory conditions.

Source: https://www.ift.org/iftnext/2019/december/researchers-create-new-plant-vaccination-method

Plastic teabags release microplastic and nanoplastic particles into brewed tea

tea

Plastic teabags release microplastic and nanoplastic particles into brewed tea, according to researchers at McGill University. However, the researchers are unsure of what the possible health effects of consuming these particles are.

Some tea manufacturers are selling tea in plastic teabags rather than paper ones. The researchers wanted to find out if these plastic teabags release microplastics and/or nanoplastic particles into the tea while steeping and if so, how much.

For the experiment, the researchers used four different commercial teas that were packed in plastic teabags. First, they emptied and washed the bags and then put them in containers of heated water to simulate brewing conditions. Using electron microscopy, they found that a single plastic teabag steeped at a typical brewing temperature (95°C) released about 11.6 billion microplastics and 3.1 billion nanoplastics into the brewed tea. The researchers determined that the composition of the plastic particles (nylon and polyethylene terephthalate) released into the brewed tea matched the original teabags. “The levels of nylon and polyethylene terephthalate particles released from the teabag packaging are several orders of magnitude higher than plastic loads previously reported in other foods,” write the researchers in the study.

The study is published in Environmental Science & Technology. More information on the research can be found in a press release from the American Chemical Society.

Source: https://www.ift.org/iftnext/2019/december/brewing-tea-in-plastic-teabags-releases-microplastic-particles-into-the-tea

How to cook Oha soup

Ingredients:

Oha leaves

Cocoyam

Red oil

Beef

Dry Fish and Stock

Ground Fresh Pepper,

Salt (to taste)

Ground crayfish

Ogiri

Notes: If you’re outside Africa, you can use cocoyam flour.

How to pound cocoyam 

Wash and cook the cocoyam until soft. Take away the peels and use a mortar and pestle to pound the corms to a swish paste.

PROCEDURE:

Wash and steam the beef, stock fish and dry fish until they’re well cooked.

Add Seasoning (Maggi/Knorr)

Add Ogri

Add pepper and ground crayfish

Add red oil

Add salt to taste

Then add the cocoyam paste (in tiny lumps).

Cover the pot and leave to cook on high heat until all the cocoyam lumps have dissolved.

Finally, add the oha leaves and allow to cook for another 10-15min.

 

Serve with Garri (Eba), flour FufuAmala, Cassava Fufu or Pounded Yam.

Youthwin roasted plumbread

Have you ever tried eating bread with roasted plum? If you haven’t tried it, then you are missing a lot.

Note: There are different species of plum. Use the one that produces oil when being roasted.

These ones usually have pleasant taste.

Procedure

Wash 5 plums, put them on a frying pan, add a little salt and put on the fire.

Stir occasionally until soft.

Remove the oblong seeds.

You can now enjoy it with a soft bread.

 

How to prepare mpoto ede soup (cocoyam leaf soup)

Ingredients:

  1. Mpoto leaf
  2. Cocoyam
  3. Palm oil
  4. Pepper (Blended)
  5. Crayfish (Blended)
  6. Egusi (Blended)
  7. Seasoning
  8. Protein ( Meat, Dry fish, and Stock fish)
  9. Salt to taste

Note: The cocoyam leaf used to prepare this soup is the one gotten from the specie of cocoyam used as thickner to prepare Bitterleaf soup, Oha soup etc

It is usually gotten during dry season when the leaf has become dry. Make sure that the leaf is very dry before you use it to cook. You can dry it in the sun for some days before using it.

Procedure:

Sqweeze the dried mpoto leaf and set aside

Wash and boil the cocoyam till very soft, remove the back and pound in a mortar.

Wash and steam the protein.

Add palm oil, the blended pepper and crayfish and allow to cook for 20min.

Add the cocoyam to the protein stock and cook until all the cocoyam has dissolved

Add the blended Egusi and seasoning.

Add salt to taste and allow for another 10min

Then add the mpoto leaf and allow for 5min

Serve with fufu, semi, garrison etc.